Skip to Content
Find a Doctor
Home|Community|Supporting Community Health in New Mexico

Supporting Community Health in New Mexico

Presbyterian Healthcare Services envisions a healthy New Mexico. We exist to improve the health of the patients, members and communities we serve. This means a commitment to improving access to healthcare, health insurance coverage and supporting everyone to have the opportunity for good health in the Land of Enchantment.

In support of this critical mission and as part of a requirement of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Presbyterian completed a community health assessment in 2013, in each of the counties where we serve the most patients. We were able to identify the priority health issues facing each of our communities. In 2012, we collaborated with New Mexico First to conduct forums to help us better understand the key drivers of some of the health issues our communities face. These reports are available for your review and comment:

Learn more bout health issues facing the communities of New Mexico

Community Health Priorities

After our research and discussions, Presbyterian has decided to focus on three priorities, which were chosen because they impact some of the root causes of the poor health of New Mexicans.

  • Eat Well. Presbyterian's healthy eating initiative includes a variety of projects designed to improve the nutrition of our residents. Specific areas of focus include nutrition education, school gardens, community-supported agriculture, and supporting growers markets and policy changes to increase the availability of healthy foods in schools and workplaces.

  • Be Active. Our active living initiative works to get New Mexicans moving. We focus on community programs to encourage indoor and outdoor activities and improving the community infrastructure to create more parks, playgrounds, safe sidewalks, and bike and walking trails.

  • Avoid Unhealthy Substance Use. Though initially focused on encouraging tobacco cessation, Presbyterian's prevention of unhealthy substance use initiative works to increase public awareness of the dangers of using unhealthy substances, supports policy changes to support prevention of unhealthy substance use, and creates incentives to encourage healthy behavior.

Community-Specific Health Priorities

Because each community faces unique challenges, Presbyterian has worked with community members and leaders to identify community-specific priorities and brainstorm effective interventions. Our implementation plans were completed in the fall of 2013. Below you will find community health needs assessments (CHNAs) and community health implementation plans (CHIPs) for each of the communities where we serve the most patients.

Central New Mexico

The central region includes Bernalillo, Torrance, Sandoval, and Valencia counties. As with most of the other areas of New Mexico, some parts of this region demonstrate low need and low barriers to care, while others, such as southern Bernalillo County and Cuba in Sandoval County, have high need and high barriers to care. While the primary contributors to poor health vary slightly from county to county, they include poverty, alcohol consumption, smoking prevalence, obesity, physical inactivity, nutritional status, and access to healthcare and healthcare coverage.

The central region is served by Presbyterian Hospital, Presbyterian Kaseman Hospital, and Presbyterian Rust Medical Center, as well as various clinics and Presbyterian Medical Group locations.

Curry County

Curry County is served by Plains Regional Medical Center, as well as affiliated clinics. The top five causes of death in Curry County include heart disease, cancer, chronic lower respiratory disease, cerebrovascular disease, and Alzheimer's disease. Some of the contributors affecting these death rates are alcohol consumption, smoking prevalence, obesity, physical inactivity, nutrition status, and access to healthcare and healthcare coverage.

Lincoln County

Lincoln County is served by Lincoln County Medical Center. The top five causes of death in Lincoln County include heart disease, cancer, unintentional injury, chronic lower respiratory disease, and diabetes. Some of the contributors affecting these death rates are alcohol consumption, smoking prevalence, obesity, physical inactivity, nutritional status, and access to healthcare and healthcare coverage.

Quay County

Quay County is served by Dr. Dan C. Trigg Memorial Hospital. The top five causes of death are cancer, heart disease, chronic lower respiratory disease, unintentional injury, and influenza and pneumonia. Fewer than 30 percent of adults and youth in Quay County smoke. Adult obesity affects 38.9 percent of residents. Suicide and alcohol death rates are much higher than state and national averages. The primary health behaviors causing death are alcohol consumption, tobacco use, obesity, physical inactivity, nutritional status, vaccination of adults, and access to healthcare.

Rio Arriba County

Rio Arriba County is served by Presbyterian Española Hospital. Contributors to poor health and even death include alcohol consumption, obesity, nutritional status, physical inactivity, and access to healthcare. The smoking prevalence is 21.8 percent in adults and 25.4 percent in youth in this area. About 71.5 percent of the population is insured for access to healthcare.

Socorro County

Socorro County is served by Socorro General Hospital. Each ZIP code in Socorro County shows a high level of community need. The top five causes of death in Socorro are heart disease, cancer, chronic lower respiratory disease, unintentional injury, and diabetes. Contributors to these diseases are alcohol consumption, obesity, nutritional status, physical inactivity, smoking prevalence, and access to healthcare.

The Southwest Region is served by.

You will need Adobe Acrobat to open these files. To provide feedback on any of these documents or to request a printed copy, please email Leigh Caswell or call 505-923-5398.

If you are trying to access our financial assistance policy, you can find that here: Financial Assistance Policy

The 2012 Report to the Community can be found here: Report to the Community

Connect to Our Community Health Initiatives

Would you like to participate in a class we are offering, learn more about the community health initiatives, or partner with us?